Visual Encyclopedia

Yarn bombing

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Arkansas Arts Center Building Yarnbomb

The yarn-bomb has been installed for “Fountain Fest,” a fund-raiser for the center’s Contemporaries auxiliary group. Via Knithacker: knithacker.com

Contributed by Kathryn Vercillo

Yarn bombing of a bull statue

Contributed by Ashleigh Linse

Bicycle yarn bombing

Contributed by Ashleigh Linse

Melissa Maddonni Haims is a Philadelphia based fiber artist who makes large scale crochet and knit sculptures incorporating recycled/ reclaimed/ found art materials.

Contributed by Kathryn Vercillo

The Ladies Fancywork Society is a yarnbombing group that I personally first learned about when I read the Yarnbombing book, which they were featured in. They started in true yarnbomb fashion as an underground group of guerilla crochet artists spreading beauty with yarnbombs around their Denver, Colorado home. Today this group of ladies is a slightly more formal art collective doing public art installations although they still do underground yarnbombing in the tradition of their old style.

Contributed by Kathryn Vercillo

Magda Sayeg is one of the major leaders in the yarnbombing movement and is the founder of Knitta Please, one of the earliest guerilla knitting groups. She does both knit and crochet work, leading community-based art displays and doing stunning installations in public spaces. Sayeg has gained credibility in the art world, working with leading brands like Etsy and Smart Car. She has been featured in solo exhibits and group shows at the National Gallery of Australia, La Museo des Esposizione in Rome and many other great galleries and museums. She is knittaplease on Facebook and @knittaporfavor on Twitter.

Contributed by Kathryn Vercillo

In 2011 the old Roman Village of Brienno was struck by an earthquake. A news report after the event starts: “Summer 2011, in two hours a huge quantity of water invades the mountain surrounding the area of a little village on the coast of Lake Como, Brienno. An immense quantity of debris destroyed the village, Brienno is now a ghost town.” Streetcolor explains that a textile artist called Elleta Handmade wanted to help bring renewed celebration to the town with a yarnbombing on the one year anniversary of the event. Requests were made for knit and crochet pieces to be sent to cover the wreckage still remaining in Brienno – a yarn-y rebirth of sorts, a handcrafted Phoenix for the ashes. The night before the installation was supposed to take place there was a huge storm that threatened another landslide but shortly thereafter the installation did go up. Even the mayor of the town helped in the yarnboming.

Contributed by Kathryn Vercillo

A public green space in Atlanta put out a call for art submissions and one of the projects approved was by a group who wanted to yarnbomb some trees in the area. I love the way that they’ve stretched themselves with some cool crochet designs and great colorwork.

Contributed by Kathryn Vercillo

Yarnbombed crochet art tree by Carol Hummel

Contributed by Kathryn Vercillo

I did this a few years back. I originally positioned it around his neck, and someone else rearranged it later to give it the snowboard dude look. It lasted for a couple of weeks.

Contributed by Betty Chang