Visual Encyclopedia

The Legend of Zelda

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Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (1988)

The game also introduced a few characters who's deeper meaning still puzzles philosopher/gamers today.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (1988)

The game also introduced many more NPCs, who would now walk around and interact with the character rather than just standing in one place without animations.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (1988)

Enemies, such as the Moblin and Darknut, returned but with different characteristics due to the changed game-play style.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (1988)

An example of the over-world view, when the player touches the fairy or the blob, the game changes to the side-view.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (1988)

Though it retained an over-world map, this title represented a drastically different approach than its predecessor- switching to a side-scrolling view whenever the player entered a square occupied by an enemy, town, or dungeon until the player departed from the side of the zone.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (1988)

This main title screen was far less grandiose than the original- with a few shooting stars rather than the color changing waterfall catching the viewers eye.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (1988)

Like its predecessor, AoL got a special departure from the all-grey cartridge of the time.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Legend of Zelda (1987) - Game cartridge.

From early on, Nintendo knew that the game was going to be big- bestowing upon it a yellow/gold cartridge.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Legend of Zelda (1987) - Cavern

Hidden lairs could also be found by burning trees or moving Armos- statues that may come to life when touched.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins

Legend of Zelda (1987) - Overworld map.

The original game's Overworld was not as simple as it may seem. Two areas, the Lost Woods and Lost Hills, would trap the player from proceeding unless they knew a precise sequence of moves needed to get to the next area. For the Lost Woods, this sequence was Up-Left-Down-Left.

Contributed by Kyle Hawkins