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Peruvian cuisine

Peruvian cuisine reflects local practices and ingredients—including influences from the indigenous population including the Inca and cuisines brought in with immigrants from Europe (Spanish cuisine, Italian cuisine, German cuisine), Asia (Chinese cuisine and Japanese cuisine) and West Africa. Without the familiar ingredients from their home countries, immigrants modified their traditional cuisines by using ingredients available in Peru. The four traditional staples of Peruvian cuisine are corn, potatoes and other tubers, Amaranthaceaes (quinoa, kañiwa and kiwicha) and legumes (beans and lupins). Staples brought by the Spanish include rice, wheat and meats (beef, pork and chicken). Many traditional foods—such as quinoa, kiwicha, chili peppers, and several roots and tubers have increased in popularity in recent decades, reflecting a revival of interest in native Peruvian foods and culinary techniques. Chef Gaston Acurio has become well known for raising awareness of local ingredients. The US food critic Eric Asimov has described it as one of the world's most important cuisines and as an exemplar of fusion cuisine, due to its long multicultural history.

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Peruvian cuisine includes a lot of starches, more starches than what we would normally put on our plate. Corn, rice, potatoes....and this piece of meat is cuy...guinea pig

Contributed by Monica Norris

Trout, potatoes, and rice...in a small restaurant in the Andes

Contributed by Monica Norris

Inca Kola, the golden Kola. It tastes like bubble gum to most people...but to me it tastes like Vanilla Mountain Dew. You can find it in Peru, but you can find it online too

Contributed by Monica Norris

This is a meal from Chanchamayo, Peru....in the jungle. It includes pork, fresh vegetables, yuka and a fresh banana ball...I believe it is baked, but it could be fried too. It was very fresh and delicious!

Contributed by Monica Norris

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