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Match

A match is a tool for starting a fire. Typically, modern matches are made of small wooden sticks or stiff paper. One end is coated with a material that can be ignited by frictional heat generated by striking the match against a suitable surface. Wooden matches are packaged in matchboxes, and paper matches are partially cut into rows and stapled into matchbooks. The coated end of a match, known as the match "head", consists of a bead of active ingredients and binder; often colored for easier inspection. There are two main types of matches: safety matches, which can be struck only against a specially prepared surface, and strike-anywhere matches, for which any suitably frictional surface can be used.

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The first self-igniting match was invented in 1805 by K. Chancel and consisted of a mixture of potassium chlorate, sulphur, sugar and rubber.

Contributed by Laura Diana Escamilla

The first self-igniting match was invented in 1805 by K. Chancel and consisted of a mixture of potassium chlorate, sulphur, sugar and rubber.

Contributed by Laura Diana Escamilla

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