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Rita Hayworth (title character) with her famous strip-tease number, the song by Allan Roberts and Doris Fisher, the aftermath making clear that she's drunk and distraught after clashing with new husband Johnny (Glenn Ford), nearing the climax in "Gilda," 1946.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

After two thugs (Charles McGraw, Williiam Conrad) release George (Harry Hayden) at the diner, Nick (Phil Brown) rushes to warn Swede (Burt Lancaster), in the first scene from Robert Siodmak's "The Killers," 1946, from the Hemingway story.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

Opening credit sequence for director Anthony Mann's "Border Incident," 1949, with Ricardo Montalban, followed by newsy narration about migrant "Braceros," cinematography by John Alton.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

Humphrey Bogart enters as Philip Marlowe, in the William Faulkner and Leigh Brackett screen treatment of Raymonnd Chandler's novel, meeting Carmen Sternwood (Martha Vickers) and the general (Charles Waldron), opening Howard Hawks' "The Big Sleep," 1946, co-starring Lauren Bacall.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

Private-eye Jeff (Robert Mitchum) continuing his flashback, covers his arrival in Acapulco and his first meeting with his target Kathie (Jane Greer), in Jacques Tourneur's "Out Of The Past," 1947.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

First part of a big showpiece for Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet, as curious Dutch novelist Leyden and thus far ill-defined Peters, the second confronting the first in his Sofia hotel room, asking why he's interested in the title character, in "The Mask Of Dimitrios," 1944.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

Frank (John Garfield) narrating, riding with Sackett (Leon Ames), whom he discovers is the D-A, meeting roadhouse owner Nick (Cecil Kellaway) and his wife Cora (Lana Turner), the famous opening from director Tay Garnett's "The Postman Always Rings Twice," 1946.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

Opening credits and the famous footsteps, in the opening to Alfred Hitchcock's "Strangers On A Train," 1951, starring Farley Granger and Robert Walker, from the novel by Patricia Highsmith.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti

Swooping around the hills above Los Angeles, Lizabeth Scott and Arthur Kennedy as married Jane and Alan, her mood instigating an unusual sequence of events, in "Too Late For Tears," 1949, from Universal and producer Hunt Stromberg, restored by the Film Noir Foundation.

Contributed by Taylor Taglianetti