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Canyon

A canyon (Spanish: cañón; archaic British English spelling: cañon) or gorge is a deep cleft between escarpments or cliffs resulting from weathering and the erosive activity of a river over geologic timescales. Rivers have a natural tendency to cut through underlying surfaces, eventually wearing away rock layers as sediments are removed downstream. A river bed will gradually reach a baseline elevation, which is the same elevation as the body of water into which the river drains. The processes of weathering and erosion will form canyons when the river's headwaters and estuary are at significantly different elevations, particularly through regions where softer rock layers are intermingled with harder layers more resistant to weathering.

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Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon doesn't look like a typical canyon, but more like a natural amphitheater filled with limestone columns called hoodoo. Now one of Utah's top tourist attractions, Bryce Canyon first gained popularity at the beginning of the 1900s, when its unearthly landscape was described in magazines and newspapers. But, due to lack of proper accommodations and difficult access to the area, it wasn't until 1920 that people actually started visiting this natural work of art.

Contributed by Laura Diana Escamilla

Blyde River Canyon

The second largest canyon in Africa and one of the largest in the world, Blyde River Canyon is considered one of the great natural wonders on the Black Continent.

Contributed by Laura Diana Escamilla

Antelope Canyon

Located on Navajo Land, in Arizona, Antelope Canyon is the most visited and photographed canyon in the United States. Its name comes from the pronghorn antelopes that once ran free through the finely carved corridors of the canyon. Once a sacred place of the Navajo people, Antelope canyon was open to the public in 1997, when it became a Navajo National Park.

Contributed by Laura Diana Escamilla

Glen Canyon

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area offers unparalleled opportunities for water-based & backcountry recreation. The recreation area stretches for hundreds of miles from Lees Ferry in Arizona to the Orange Cliffs of southern Utah, encompassing scenic vistas, geologic wonders, and a panorama of human history. Additionally, the controversy surrounding the construction of Glen Canyon Dam and the creation of Lake Powell contributed to the birth of the modern day environmental movement. The park offers opportunities for boating, fishing, swimming, back country hiking and four-wheel drive trips.Outdoor activities are what Glen Canyon is all about. Whether you're on your own or on a guided trip, there is something for everyone's taste. www.nationalparks.org

Contributed by Laura Diana Escamilla

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