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ACT (test)

The ACT (/ s t/; originally an abbreviation of American College Testing) college readiness assessment is a standardized test for high school achievement and college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, a nonprofit of the same name. The ACT originally consisted of four tests: English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Natural Sciences. In 1989, the Social Studies test was changed into a Reading section (which included a Social Studies subsection) and the Natural Sciences test was renamed the Science Reasoning test, with more emphasis on problem solving skills. In February 2005, an optional Writing test was added to the ACT, mirroring changes to the SAT that took place later in March of the same year. In 2013, ACT announced that students would be able to take the ACT by computer starting in the spring of 2015. The test will continue to be offered in the paper format for schools that are not ready to transition to computer testing.

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*Science: Although the section is titled "science", it's really not. You don't need any biology, chemistry, or physics knowledge to answer these questions correctly. You just need common sense. The answers are in the data tables, you just have to find it.

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

*Reading: You have 4 passages to complete in 35 minutes. You have approximately 9 minutes for each passage. Use 3-4 minutes to read the passage. Actually read. Use the rest of the 5 minutes to answer questions. It usually goes quick if you read the passage. Usually 3 questions will tell you to go to a specific line. 1 will be defining a word. 2 will be on main point of the passage. Do the passages in order. You can't tell which passage will be the easiest and you are wasting your time by reading the passages out of order.

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

*Math: The same concepts are on the test every year. There are usually 2-3 questions on each concept. When you can't answer a question, SKIP IT. Skip when you don't know. It gives you more time at the end. Answer those that you know and leave the hard ones for last. Don't get stuck on a hard question since every question is worth the same. In the time you figure out the answer for the hard question, you could have answered 2-3 easy questions. Also, the questions get harder as you progress so you should be able to go quick for the first 20 questions.

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

*English: There are 9 or 10 grammar rules that can let you answer around 50/75 questions. Most of the other questions ask about the main point of the passage and if the paragraphs/sentences are in the right order. Know the grammar rules.

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

Take the ACT at least twice during your junior year. You don't want to stress your senior year. You already have a lot on your plate senior year. You don't want to add taking the ACT again because you didn't get the score you wanted. Play it safe.

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

1. Get the Real ACT book. 2. Take previously administered ACT tests. The same concepts and questions are asked every year. 3. Take 1 practice test every day. Go over your answers. But actually go over them and see why you got those questions wrong. 4. Make the practice test as realistic as possible: no distractions and no food. 5. Don't study the day before the test. Don't even think about the ACT or school. Go hangout with your friends. You don't want to stress yourself the day before the test or you won't be able to sleep and you will be really nervous during the test.

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

ACT

ACT

Me after taking every ACT test

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

ACT

ACT

So stressful

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

ACT

ACT

Please look over your answers

Contributed by Sofia Huaman

This website is the best tool I have found!

Contributed by Lacey Sowards

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