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A calculus project intended to give a brief introduction into quadratic functions using a real life example. It is both educational and humorous

Posted in Quadratic function

Work and Energy: A Brief Summary When one thinks of the word “work”, one thinks of something that requires the use of physical or mental energy. As in everyday life, work and energy are also closely related in physics. Work is defined as the product of the component of a force along the direction of displacement and the magnitude of the displacement. In simpler terms, work is the force exerted on an object. In order to find work, one would use the formula W=F*d*cos Θ, which is read as follows: work equals force times displacement times the cosine of the angle theta. Energy is divided into two basic categories in physics: kinetic and potential. Kinetic energy is the energy of an object that is due to the object’s motion, the key phrase being “object in motion”. The formula for kinetic energy is KE= ½ mv2, read as Kinetic Energy equals one half of the mass times the squared velocity, or speed. Potential energy is energy associated with an object that has the potential to move because of its position relative to some other location. Basically, it deals with an object not yet in motion but that has the potential to be in motion because of its shape, position, or condition. There are two kinds of potential energy. The first is gravitational potential energy, which is the potential energy stored in the gravitational fields of interacting bodies. The formula for gravitational potential energy is Peg=mgh, mass times gravity (which is defined as 9.81 m/s2) times height. The second type is elastic potential energy, which is the energy available for use when a deformed elastic object returns to its original configuration. The formula is PEeleastic= ½ kx2, or one half of the spring constant—a parameter that is a measure of a spring’s resistance to being compressed or stretched—times the squared distance (represented by x) compressed or stretched. Using Multimedia As technology continues to evolve, new ways of teaching continue to arise. Teaching through multimedia has become a popular way to learn in schools. Teachers use power points, videos, music, and forms of art to teach students. This can be a highly effective way of teaching. What once took days to teach can now take less than an hour. Multimedia teaching is mainly beneficial to the more visual and hands on learners, although it can help everyone. About the Sampled School Los Angeles Adventist Academy is a small religious institution located in Los Angeles and founded by the Seventh-Day Adventist church. The school consists of grades K-12. The junior high consists of grades 7 and 8 and has a population of approximately 40 students. The junior high has a diverse population made up of many different races and religious preferences. The students are taught the basic core curriculum for their grade level, along with Spanish and computer applications. Learning Habits of 7th and 8th Graders The mind of a middle school-aged student is as ripe as a small sponge. During this stage of adolescent brain growth, new ways of thinking emerge, such as critical thinking, problem solving, planning, and controlling impulses. Research shows that the mind of 7th and 8th graders can hold between 5 to 7 bits of new information at a time. Therefore, cramming is not an effective way of teaching their young minds. The best way to approach their young minds is by teaching engaging lessons. The more engaging the lesson, the more likely they will retain the information. In order for them to process new information one must provide opportunities to reinforce the material. Reinforcement is the key in moving material from short term memory and connecting that same new material to the part of the brain that stores long term memories. The twentieth century today has changed drastically in numerous ways, including learning, studying, and teaching. The old conventional way of learning, studying, and teaching has been pushed slightly to the side in order to embrace new methods better suited for the new technological advancements. Studies have shown that students learn and absorb information in different ways based on their individual personalities. Linguistic, auditory-musical, visual, kinesthetic, mathematical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal are the different types of learning styles. While conducting the research, the main objective will be to find whether the information can be processed retained using three of the major learning styles: visual, auditory, and linguistic learning. These three learning styles were chosen as a way to target a broader group of students. Since this is the day and age for technology and music videos, a tutorial seemed to be the best way to combine all three learning style types into one teaching tool. Procedure To determine whether or not the use of multimedia in teaching junior high school aged children physics is effective; we will test it by performing the following procedure: Step 1: Distribute the 7th and 8th graders equally into two groups, so that there are two 7th graders and two 8th graders in each group. One group will be the control group, and the other will be the treatment group. Step 2: Administer the pre-test to the treatment group, and record the results. Step 3: Show the treatment group the video tutorial. Observe and record the subjects’ behavior during the viewing. Step 4: Administer the post test, and record the results. Step 5: Pass out the post-tutorial questionnaire for them to take home and bring back the next day. Step 6: Administer the pre-test to the control group, and record the results. Step 7: Lecture the control group. Observe and record the subjects’ behavior during the lecture. Step 8: After the tutorial, administer the post test, and record the results. Step 9: Pass out the post-lecture questionnaire for them to take home and bring back the next day. About the Video After using a survey to gather information from the seventh and eighth grade classes of Los Angeles Adventist Academy, we concluded that middle school children learn better with music, particularly of the pop and Hip-Hop variety. We also learned that the majority of them enjoy sports. Because of this knowledge, we incorporated music and sports-related examples into our video tutorial. About the Lecture During the lecture, we were able to act out our real-life examples and base them on the interests of our subjects. Results Each subject in the control group increased their scores by 20%, while the treatment group shared no real common increase in score. However, 50% of the group decreased by 20%. I theorize that because the overload of information provided by the video confused the subjects, causing them to second guess themselves. Discussion Contrary to the results, the video tutorial group actually believed the video to be effective in teaching them work and energy. This goes to show that test results aren’t everything. A student might fail a test, but that doesn’t mean that they did not learn anything. Both groups had varying results. According to the two tests administered to the subjects, only 50% of the treatment group actually grasped the concepts presented to them in the video tutorial, while 100% of the subjects in the control group grasped the concepts presented to them in the lecture. Surprisingly, the control group had the highest rate of increase. This means that the lecture was the most effective teaching method. For anyone wanting to continue or redo this research, I have several recommendations. First and foremost, it is vital that future researchers use a larger sample. The sample used in this project was extremely small, and that played a huge role in the results. One should collect children from various schools in various neighborhoods. Future researchers should be sure that their subjects are at the same learning level. Due to a lack of resources, we were forced to go by the subjects’ teacher’s word—which was most likely based upon their track record at turning in their schoolwork—rather than by the results of their standardized tests. Also, the subject taught may have been too complex for this age group to learn through multimedia. It would be wise to do this study with different subjects, perhaps less advanced ones. There are many factors that affect one’s results, such as what time of day the experiment is performed, and even what the subjects had for breakfast that morning. So lastly, I strongly recommend that future research on this subject be more controlled than that of our research. Conclusion According to the results, the lecture was the most effective teaching method. However, I do not think the results are significant enough to rule out multimedia learning altogether. The students seemed to enjoy both styles of learning. Because of that, I recommend that teachers establish a middle ground in using both lectures and multimedia.

Posted in Physics education

A moral issue is an issue involving inherent or acquired human values. For Christians, moral issues are usually based off of biblical principles and they tend to be issues that people debate over as to whether they are wrong or not. In the Bible, these wrong things are defined as sins. There are three big moral issues in today’s society, namely, abortions, the legalization of marijuana, and gay marriage. These three issues have caused much controversy over the past few years. However, moral issues are not limited to those three matters. Significant moral issues also include cheating, stealing, adultery, envy, covetousness, slander, murder, idolatry, gluttony, fornic ation, violence, gambling, and lying. This is because these actions may be clear cut sins for some readers of the Bible, but other individuals may feel such actions are justifiable, even acceptable. I, however, believe that lying is never acceptable, especially the lying that takes place in The Count of Monte Cristo. The consequences can ruin lives, which brings me to the focus of this paper. In this paper, I will focus on how the moral issue of lying has appeared in the novel, The Count of Monte Cristo, and how it affects the lives of the characters. A lie can be simply defined as an untruth. It can also be defined as a misleading or deceitful statement. George Bancroft once said, “Dishonesty is so grasping it would deceive God himself, were it possible.” Lying has been around for a very long time. Amazingly, the first lie ever told was actually recorded in the Bible at Genesis 3:4: “And the serpent said to the woman, You shall not surely die.” This was a lie told nearly at the beginning of time, from Satan the Devil to the first woman Eve in regards to the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. Adam and Eve chose to sin against God, making God’s once perfect creations anything but. As descendants of Adam and Eve, we have inherited their imperfection. It is in our nature to sin, and the most common sin of all is lying. We all lie, some of us more than others. However, just because it is in our nature doesn’t make it right. Lying is a prevalent moral issue in The Count of Monte Cristo, a novel authored by Alexander Dumas. It is at the root of their problems. Lying is morally wrong and has chaotic consequences. This is exemplified when one slanderous lie offsets a tumultuous turn of events. Lives are turned upside down, and some are even lost. The entire plot is centered on lies and deceit. A somewhat controversial issue dealing with lying is the withholding of information. Is the withholding of information “lying”? Yes, because by withholding information, one consciously causes a person to believe something that is not the truth, thus making the withholder a liar. Edmond Dantes, the novel’s protagonist, is guilty of withholding information. When he is asked to deliver a letter as his deceased captain’s dying wish, he withholds the details as to who the letter is from and who it is addressed to. As an indirect result of that lie, Dantes eventually lost everything. The three antagonists of the book harbor a strong dislike for Dantes, each for a different reason. Danglars, the main antagonist, envies the way Dantes is loved by the crew members and Monsieur Morrel, and also of Dantes’s new position as captain of the ship. Caderousse thinks him to be too arrogant, while Fernand is coveting Dantes’s girlfriend. Not surprisingly, they all band together to make Dantes fall. Danglars writes a letter to the authorities, claiming that Dantes is in possession of a letter from Napoleon Bonaparte with intentions to overthrow the king. However, this is only the beginning of the drama. The letter in itself is a lie. But then, Danglars pretends to throw the letter away when Caderousse objects. Fernand goes back to retrieve it, and they mail it off. Although Caderousse had no part in the letter being mailed off, he still took part in pumping them up with evil thoughts about Dantes. Because of the lies contained in the slanderous letter, the public prosecutor is forced to pay Dantes a visit. Villefort was one of the biggest liars in this story. Villefort, the public prosecutor of Versailles, is from a treasonous heritage, with his father being a secret supporter of Napoleon. It was his duty to arrest anyone thought to be plotting against the king, but he let his father run free, so as not to bring shame upon his family. By letting his father roam free, he violated his code of ethics, which could be considered, in a sense, lying. Then, he arrested a man he believed to be innocent—Dantes—so that his secret would be kept safe. After Napoleon regained his power and Bonapartism became legal, Villefort still did not release Dantes from prison. He then proceeded to lie to Monsieur Morrel when he inquired about Dantes’s release. Villefort’s lies he recorded on Dantes files also caused Dantes to not get a fair trial. Of course, we must not forget about Villefort’s father, Noirtier. He is not merely a Bonapartist sympathizer, but an activist in the battle. Because of this, he is forced to live life on the run. Noirtier’s decision to live a life of deceit put his family name at risk. It’s also the reason Villefort puts an innocent man in prison. Earlier on in the book, we learned that Dantes’s fiancé, Mercedes, threatened to commit suicide if Dantes died. So far in the story, Dantes was called away from his engagement dinner to be thrown into prison. He has lost six years of his life. Dantes’ father has died of distress from his son’s imprisonment. Danglars moved to Madrid, for fear that his lies would catch up with him. Dantes attempts suicide by starvation, and almost succeeds. By the mercy of God, he was interrupted. But imagine, if he had succeeded in killing himself, then Mercedes would have surely killed herself, too. These are only a few of the chaotic consequences that came about from their lies. All lies have consequences, some more severe than others. People find many reasons to lie, some of them good, some of them bad. But, does the reason behind a lie really matter? Is a lie ever justifiable? Well. I believe that if one lies for one’s own selfish gain, then it is not justifiable. However, if one lies for a good cause, as in to save a life or even just to spare someone’s feelings, it is justified, still while being morally unacceptable. If a child is pushed by another child, they are justified in pushing that child back. However, the adult in charge will most likely punish both of the children. This is because justification of a wrongdoing does not make that wrongdoing any less wrong. Thus, if a lie is justified, that doesn’t make it any less wrong. Danglars’s and Fernand’s lies were nowhere near justified. They only had themselves in mind when they devised that letter. They were willing to hurt Dantes—an innocent man—just so they could get what they wanted. Fernand was also willing to hurt Mercedes, the woman he claimed to love so dearly. He knew Dantes going to prison would hurt her, yet he went through with it anyway. Villefort’s lies could be considered somewhat justified. He was simply trying to protect his family’s name. He did not want shame brought upon his family. However, his pride blinded him from seeing just how far he had gone. Edmond Dantes’ lie at the beginning of the story could be considered justified, as it was probably done to protect the good name of his dead captain and, possibly, his own. But, lying was still the wrong thing to do. Although he was only trying to do the right thing by his captain, he could have endangered many people by doing so. What if Napoleon had been planning a violent attack on France and the letter being delivered had been equivalent to the pulling of the trigger? Dantes did not know what was in that letter. However, he did know that it contained treasonous information. Lying is a moral issue because some people feel that a lie is a lie, justified or not, while others may feel that lying is okay in certain situations. The Count of Monte Cristo is filled to the brim with lies and deceit. The conflict is centered on the acidic lies of several people. The lying brings on the chaotic events of the story, just as sin brings on the chaotic events of the world that we live in. Lying is morally wrong and never acceptable, but is justifiable on rare occasions. Why? Not only does it bring chaotic consequences, but God Himself said so: “There are six things that the Lord hates, seven that are an abomination to him: haughty eyes, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that devises wicked plans, feet that make haste to run to evil, a false witness who breathes out lies, and one who sows discord among brothers.”(Proverbs 6:16-19)

Posted in The Count of Monte Cristo

Introduction The Ferris wheel has everything to do with centripetal acceleration. It is made up of a base that serves to hold up a wheel with gondolas attached to the rim. The centripetal acceleration is responsible for the gondola occupants’ feelings of weightlessness and heaviness. The Ferris wheel also has to do with force, acceleration, and velocity. In example, the amount of force applied by the brakes affects how fast the Ferris wheel stops, and vice versa for the amount of force applied to the starter. I originally chose this roller coaster because it seemed like the easiest roller coaster to engineer. As I began building it, I discovered just how wrong I was. Background Information George W. Ferris was a bridge builder from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania who founded the G.W.G Ferris & Co., a firm that inspected and tested metals. An architect by the name of Daniel H. Burnham was put in charge of selecting the project for the Chicago’s World Fair. He vented his frustrations at finding a suitable project at a banquet in 1891. Ferris, who was present that night, became inspired and sketched out the design for the Ferris wheel on a napkin. The wheel had a diameter of 250 feet and a circumference of 825 feet. Powered by a 1000-horsepower engine, the spinning wheel had 36 wooden cars that held up to sixty people, each. The ride only cost $.50, but because of its high capacity, it made $726,805.50 during the World’s Fair. While the original Ferris wheel was destroyed in 1906, there have been many more built. Over the years, architects have gotten creative with Ferris wheel designs. Number eight on Listverse’s “Top Ten Ferris Wheels” list, Santa Monica Pier’s Ferris wheel has 160,000 energy-efficient LED lights and is the world’s first solar-powered Ferris wheel. The Wonder Wheel, built in 1920, was the first wheel to have passenger seats slide on tracks within the wheel’s frame as it rotates, along with some attached to the outer frame of the wheel. While the most known Ferris wheel, the London Eye, is located in England, Ferris wheels are most prevalent in Japan. This is because Japan is an amusement park culture. In China are six out of ten of the world’s tallest Ferris wheels. My Ferris while, while equally as wonderful, is nowhere near as extravagant as the aforementioned ones. Rather, it is a simple wheel, made out of popsicle sticks. Materials • Approximately 50 popsicle sticks or tongue depressors • Hot glue gun • Drill bit • Dowels (7 or more) • Cupcake wrappers • Ribbed foam grips Method 1. Arrange three Popsicle sticks (or six for a larger wheel, two to a side) into a triangle. 2. Glue the ends of each Popsicle stick together, securing the three points of your triangle, and allow time to dry. 3. Attach two more sticks to the first triangle. The two new sticks need to be glued to the corners of one side of the triangle. Two more sticks are glued to that triangle. Each new triangle should share a side with the previous triangle. Continue until your triangles meet up with the other side of the first triangle and you have created a wheel. Make a second wheel in the same manner. 4. Use the drill bit to drill an off-center hole into each wheel. If you center it, the wheel will not spin. Your holes must be as close to the center as possible, but not quite in the center. 5. Break Popsicle sticks in half and attach them to the two wheels as cross bars. You will need to break half the number of Popsicle sticks as you have sides to your wheels as these sticks are to be spaced evenly in the same intervals as your triangles. For example, if your wheels have six sides, you will need three Popsicle sticks for this step. 6. Repeat step five with your wooden dowels, placing one between each cross bar. 7. Construct two large triangles for the base. Use at least one more stick per triangle side than you used for your wheels. Allow one corner of these triangles to meet further down from the tip of the Popsicle sticks, creating an "X" at the top. 8. Attach your two base triangles together by gluing two sticks to the insides of the bottom two corners of both triangles. 9. Insert a dowel through the holes drilled into the wheel. 10. Put a ribbed foam grip on the both ends of the dowel sticking out of the wheel. 11. Place the wheel on the base so that the foam grips rest in the crook of the base triangles. You may glue the foam grips down if you’d like. 12. Test your wheel to make sure it spins by twirling one end of the dowel. Conclusion I chose to construct my project using popsicle sticks because it was the most cost-effective method. However, it was also the most tedious and complicated. I had to make sure every single cross bar was even, which is difficult considering that they had to be broken in half. Then of course, there was the matter of trying to get the wheel to spin without hitting the base or without falling off or stopping. The instructions for building a Ferris wheel out of popsicle sticks originally called for a paperclip to hold up the wheel and for four sticks instead of two to support the base. But, when I realized that my popsicle sticks were technically tongue depressors and a lot larger and heavier than they were supposed to be, I had to improvise. Thankfully, my improvising worked out for the best. If I were to do this project over again, I would choose quality over cheapness. I could have avoided a lot of hassle if I had chosen a different material to construct my wheel out of. While I experienced numerous obstacles throughout my engineering experience, I have to admit that I did have fun. Not everyone can say that they built a Ferris wheel all by themselves. Throughout this project I have learned the role of physics not only in roller coasters but also in our everyday lives. Physics is everywhere; we just have to know what it is to find it.

Posted in Ferris wheel

It sneaks up on you when you least expect it, attacking the walls of your arteries with a force great enough to kill. Most people don’t even hear it coming until it’s too late to stop it. It’s silent but deadly. What is this “silent killer”, you ask? It is hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Blood pressure is defined as the measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as the heart pumps blood through your body. So, what constitutes high blood pressure? Well, one must first understand how blood pressure is measured. It is measured in millimeters of mercury and given as two numbers, one over the other like a fraction. The numerator is called the systolic pressure. This is a measurement of the pressure in one’s arteries when the heart beats. In order for a systolic pressure to be considered normal, it would have to be below 120 most of the time. For it to be considered high, it would have to be over 140 most of the time. The denominator is called the diastolic pressure, a measure of the pressure in one’s arteries between heartbeats. A normal diastolic pressure would be below 80 most of the time, while a high diastolic pressure would be above 90 most of the time. The key four words here are “most of the time”. For instance, if one visits a doctor and has his or her blood pressure measure—with the standard device, the inflatable arm cuff pressure-measuring gauge--and it turns out to be 150/95 mmHg, that does not mean he or she has hypertension. For someone to be diagnosed with hypertension, they would have to have a high blood pressure at two or more readings. Hypertension isn’t known as the “silent killer” for nothing. Most people diagnosed with hypertension exhibit zero signs or symptoms, even when their blood pressure reaches dangerously high levels. A few people in the early stages of hypertension might experience dizzy spells, nose bleeds, or dull headaches. However, these symptoms usually do not occur until high blood pressure has reached a severe or life-threatening level. Other symptoms include fatigue, confusion, and irregular heartbeat. These are also symptoms of dangerously high blood pressure. Most of the time, the right medical treatment can prevent blood pressure from reaching such levels. Treatments for hypertension include medications such as thiazide diuretics, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, renin inhibitors, and Omega-3 fish oil receptors. More often than not, a single drug is not enough to treat one’s hypertension. Doctors will generally prescribe two or more drugs to a hypertension patient. Some natural treatments include regular consumption of garlic, regular exercise, and a healthy diet. But really, whatever treatment works best depends on the type of hypertension. There are two main types of hypertension. The most common type is known as primary or essential hypertension. It is known to develop gradually over years. Experts have yet to fully understand the exact cause of primary hypertension. However, they have been able to identify some contributing factors, such as aging, excessive alcohol consumption, excessive sodium consumption, lack of exercise, lack of proper diet, obesity, and high levels of stress. African Americans are most prone to this type of hypertension. The second type is secondary hypertension. While the least common of the two, secondary hypertension causes the highest pressure. It is caused by an underlying condition. Kidney problems, adrenal gland tumors, birth defects in blood vessels, certain medications--birth controls, cold remedies, decongestants, over-the-counter pain relievers, etc.—and illegal drugs are all causes of secondary hypertension. While both numbers in a blood pressure reading are important, the systolic reading is even more significant for those over the age of 60. When the diastolic pressure is normal but the systolic pressure is high it called isolated systolic pressure. This is the most common type of high blood pressure among adults over 50 years of age. This is, of course, a form of primary hypertension. Another form of hypertension is called white-coat hypertension. This is a condition in which one’s blood pressure rises every time they visit a doctor or hospital. To separate white-coat hypertension patients from actual hypertension patients, if the doctor suspects a patient to have white-coat hypertension, he will have the patient measure their own blood pressure in a place outside of a medical setting, such as their home or job. Approximately 1 in 3 adults are diagnosed with hypertension. In 1999 alone, 16,968 U.S. deaths were due to hypertension. High blood pressure is a common and deadly disease. It’s nothing to be played with. Anyone who suspects that they have hypertension should seek medical attention immediately. However, if one is unable to go to go see a medical professional, do no fret. Thanks to advances in technology and the generosity of CVS, nearly every American has the opportunity walk into their local CVS and have their blood pressure taken for free by a machine. Oh, the beauty of science!

Posted in Hypertension

It sneaks up on you when you least expect it, attacking the walls of your arteries with a force great enough to kill. Most people don’t even hear it coming until it’s too late to stop it. It’s silent but deadly. What is this “silent killer”, you ask? It is hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Blood pressure is defined as the measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as the heart pumps blood through your body. So, what constitutes high blood pressure? Well, one must first understand how blood pressure is measured. It is measured in millimeters of mercury and given as two numbers, one over the other like a fraction. The numerator is called the systolic pressure. This is a measurement of the pressure in one’s arteries when the heart beats. In order for a systolic pressure to be considered normal, it would have to be below 120 most of the time. For it to be considered high, it would have to be over 140 most of the time. The denominator is called the diastolic pressure, a measure of the pressure in one’s arteries between heartbeats. A normal diastolic pressure would be below 80 most of the time, while a high diastolic pressure would be above 90 most of the time. The key four words here are “most of the time”. For instance, if one visits a doctor and has his or her blood pressure measure—with the standard device, the inflatable arm cuff pressure-measuring gauge--and it turns out to be 150/95 mmHg, that does not mean he or she has hypertension. For someone to be diagnosed with hypertension, they would have to have a high blood pressure at two or more readings. Hypertension isn’t known as the “silent killer” for nothing. Most people diagnosed with hypertension exhibit zero signs or symptoms, even when their blood pressure reaches dangerously high levels. A few people in the early stages of hypertension might experience dizzy spells, nose bleeds, or dull headaches. However, these symptoms usually do not occur until high blood pressure has reached a severe or life-threatening level. Other symptoms include fatigue, confusion, and irregular heartbeat. These are also symptoms of dangerously high blood pressure. Most of the time, the right medical treatment can prevent blood pressure from reaching such levels. Treatments for hypertension include medications such as thiazide diuretics, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, renin inhibitors, and Omega-3 fish oil receptors. More often than not, a single drug is not enough to treat one’s hypertension. Doctors will generally prescribe two or more drugs to a hypertension patient. Some natural treatments include regular consumption of garlic, regular exercise, and a healthy diet. But really, whatever treatment works best depends on the type of hypertension. There are two main types of hypertension. The most common type is known as primary or essential hypertension. It is known to develop gradually over years. Experts have yet to fully understand the exact cause of primary hypertension. However, they have been able to identify some contributing factors, such as aging, excessive alcohol consumption, excessive sodium consumption, lack of exercise, lack of proper diet, obesity, and high levels of stress. African Americans are most prone to this type of hypertension. The second type is secondary hypertension. While the least common of the two, secondary hypertension causes the highest pressure. It is caused by an underlying condition. Kidney problems, adrenal gland tumors, birth defects in blood vessels, certain medications--birth controls, cold remedies, decongestants, over-the-counter pain relievers, etc.—and illegal drugs are all causes of secondary hypertension. While both numbers in a blood pressure reading are important, the systolic reading is even more significant for those over the age of 60. When the diastolic pressure is normal but the systolic pressure is high it called isolated systolic pressure. This is the most common type of high blood pressure among adults over 50 years of age. This is, of course, a form of primary hypertension. Another form of hypertension is called white-coat hypertension. This is a condition in which one’s blood pressure rises every time they visit a doctor or hospital. To separate white-coat hypertension patients from actual hypertension patients, if the doctor suspects a patient to have white-coat hypertension, he will have the patient measure their own blood pressure in a place outside of a medical setting, such as their home or job. Approximately 1 in 3 adults are diagnosed with hypertension. In 1999 alone, 16,968 U.S. deaths were due to hypertension. High blood pressure is a common and deadly disease. It’s nothing to be played with. Anyone who suspects that they have hypertension should seek medical attention immediately. However, if one is unable to go to go see a medical professional, do no fret. Thanks to advances in technology and the generosity of CVS, nearly every American has the opportunity walk into their local CVS and have their blood pressure taken for free by a machine. Oh, the beauty of science!

Posted in Ferris wheel