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Kati Waldrop

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Posts

Archive of Our Own (AO3) is a rapidly growing fanfiction and fanart archive that, while it is still in beta, offers generally more skilled work than FF.net with easier search function than LiveJournal. There is a waiting list for invitations, but they are distributed fairly rapidly and the many extra features the site offers for portraying your work the way you like makes the wait well worth it.

Posted in Fan fiction

Tea is a major cause of the 'television pickup' phenomenon of Britain, as the public tends to watch the same television channels and take advantage of the same breaks to operate kettles. This causes a large spike of demand on the National Grid unmatched by supply, necessitating a Balancing Team to maintain a sufficient supply of energy.

Posted in Tea

Several clues to Season Three have been published through Moffat and Gatiss' Twitter accounts to tantalise fans. Season Three Episode One will be titled 'The Empty Hearse'; the three words given for this season as hints to the titles are 'Rat, Wedding, Bow'. Moffat has promised an even more puzzling conclusion to this season than to the last, which is mildly terrifying.

Posted in Sherlock (TV series)

Not for the weak of stomach. An interesting video about the UT Body Farm and its study of decomposition on cadavers.

Posted in Cadaver

Because a putrefying body's liquefying organs leach out into the soil around it, the unique fatty acids and compounds (such as putrescine, cadaverine, skatole, and indole) of the decay process can be used to determine where the body decomposed. Jennifer Love, a graduate student at UT, has been working on developing an aroma scan technology that can identify the unique odour signatures of the stages of decay. Humans remains dogs are already capable of this; they can detect the scent molecules for up to fourteen months after the body has been removed, and can smell them even when the body is at the bottom of a lake because the odours rise to the surface.

Posted in Cadaver