Visual Encyclopedia

Mollie Wyatt

www.yourwebsite.com | CLICK TO UNLOCK!
www.yourwebsite.com |  50 IR to unlock
  | edit
this will contain any error messages
this will contain any error messages
Saving...
  25 IR to unlock
this will contain any error messages
Saving...
About you | CLICK TO UNLOCK!
About you |  5 IR to unlock

| edit

Posts

Ah, danmaku. Otherwise known as "bullet hell" games, it is a type of shoot-em-up that requires a player to dodge an insane amount of different types of bullets. Touhou Project does it well and does it pretty, with bullet patterns that have an aesthetic appeal. It is also insanely hard.

Posted in Touhou Project

Touhou Project is notorious for its immense cast of characters. (This isn't even all of them!) And if you look closely, you'll notice they're all female.

Posted in Touhou Project

(Picture credit goes to bamaboy1941 on Flickr) Besides being famous for the ghost story of Condie Cunningham, the University of Montevallo has newfound fame in the "Becoming" Sculpture. It depicts structure and guidance, given to students by their teachers, who go into life with the knowledge and hard work. It was sculpted by Ted Metz, a professor at the university, with the help of his students. It was dedicated on February 18, 2003.

Posted in University of Montevallo

If you haven't heard, EV training is currently the most popular way to train Pokemon when battling competitively. EV training takes some getting used to, but it becomes easy the more you practice. Here are some video links that teach the basics of EV Training! www.youtube.com (Competitive Battling Guide by Kanto University; a detailed series for the serious battlers) www.youtube.com (How to EV Train by Tamashii Hiroka, who is good at keeping it simple) www.youtube.com (EVs and IVs Explained by JWittz; explains what EVs ARE and what they mean)

Posted in Pokémon

Working at a convention is fun, but it is a LOT of hard work. I work for HAMACON, a convention located in Huntsville, Alabama. This year is my third year, and I've loved every minute of it. When you work for a convention, you're usually delegated to a section of work (registration, security, cosplay, etc). There is a head of that department who is your boss for the weekend. You work in shifts, like a regular job. You do NOT get paid; basically, you get into the convention for free. And it can be tough work; I'm usually exhausted by weekend's end. But it is definitely something to consider if you love making people happy about Japanese fan culture.

Posted in Anime convention