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Stephanie Federman

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UCSC

Poli Sci

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Posts

Looks like there's some big changes on the horizon.

Posted in League of Legends

It's a couple months old, but still relevant.

Posted in League of Legends

A list of 10 particularly interesting Japanese ghouls, goblins, or whatever you'd like to call them. My favorite would have to be the Kappa.

Posted in Mythology

Stephanie Federman just earned a profile!

Please welcome Stephanie by checking out the profile: sussle.org

Posted in Sussle

These things should be common sense, but I know better than anyone it's easy to lose focus of what's important when living it up at a convention. 1) Stay fed and hydrated! I can't tell you how many conventions I've been to in which I didn't get enough to eat, and nearly collapsed because of it. Not to mention, drinking is common-place at conventions. A combination of dehydration, lack of nutrition, and alcohol is a bad mix! 2) Stay clean! I've dealt with more than a few people that should've practiced common hygiene. Especially considering most people share a room with 3 or 4 others, it's important to be considerate. Shower every day, and use deodorant please! 3) Most importantly, stay safe!

Posted in Anime convention

This young artist from Iwate is unique in that she uses elements of traditional folk music in her songs. This song is particularly beautiful, because she sings of the beauty of her hometown, and everything she misses about it.

Posted in Music of Japan

Okashi

The making of a popular Japanese pastry, Taiyaki, at a department store.

Posted in Japan

Sakura

Cherry blossom tress in bloom at Ohira Shrine- Tochigi City, Tochigi Prefecture

Posted in Japan

If you are studying Japanese, you may have come across the character つ or tsu in your studies. What some people don't understand, is that tsu can also be silent. When you see a smaller tsu in the middle of a word, you don't pronounce the tsu, but rather emphasize the character that follows it. A very common example would be the word 学校=がっこう=gakkou. Notice there is a tiny tsu between ga and ko, and when the word is written out in romanji, it's shown as a double consonant. What this indicates is that you would take a small pause between ga and ko. Don't drag out the pause; it's really only meant to last not even a second.

Posted in Japanese language