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Ben Aaron Shea

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The choices Macbeth makes in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth ultimately cause the events that occur in his life regardless of the witches’ prophecies, fate and free will. Macbeth is given light to opportunity from the beginning of the play along with the free will to choose what fate he may pursue. Though there are many enticing factors that come into play (including the seduction from Lady Macbeth and the half-truths that the witches prophecy), the end result is the effect of Macbeth’s own cause. Macbeth has more than one opportunity to repent of his deeds and yet chooses to relentlessly follow the path to destruction. When his wife commits suicide, still he feels no remorse. Thus “evil must inevitably breed its own destruction” (Ribner 249). Works Cited Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. Glencoe Literature the Readers Choice. Ed. Jeffrey Wilhelm. New York: McGraw Hill Glencoe, 2009. 319-402. Print. Curry, Walter. “Supernatural Elements”. Shakespeare for Students. Ed. Mark Scott. Vol. 1. Gale Research: Detroit, 1992. Print. 3 vols. Doren, Mark. “Overview”. Shakespeare for Students. Ed. Mark Scott. Vol. 1. Gale Research: Detroit, 1992. Print. 3 vols. Ribner, Irving. “Evil”. Shakespeare for Students. Ed. Mark Scott. Vol. 1. Gale Research: Detroit, 1992. Print. 3 vols.

Posted in Macbeth

Though the weird sisters are the first to water the seed of ambition for Macbeth, their prophecies are not the cause of the events that occur in Macbeth’s life. It is when the witches hail Macbeth as “thane of Cawdor” and “king hereafter” (1.3.52-53) that Macbeth becomes curios of what these prophecies might mean. The witches do not cause the change in heart of Macbeth however; he does that all his own when Ross pronounces him thane of Cawdor (1.3.110-11). The predictions “arouse his passions” and “inflame his imagination” (Curry 257). The prophecies “set his heart knocking at his ribs” and takes him to “unsafe extremities of rhetoric” (Doren 242). These “unsafe extremities of rhetoric” are evident in events such as the death of Banquo. Just before the murder, Macbeth utters “Come seeling night, Scarf up the tender eye of pitiful day;” in order to “tear to pieces the great bond Which keeps me pale!” (3.2.46-50). This “great bond” could be the prophecy of the witches or “Banquo’s lease on life” (Ribner 246). It is clear from either interpretation that the witches do not have a role to play in the decisions Macbeth is making. Macbeth still decides to go ahead with the murder. This is a pivotal realization regarding the witches as they “do not suggest evil to man” but simply “suggest an object which may incite the inclination to evil” that is in man from the moment of birth (Ribner 247). The role of the witches in the deterioration of Macbeth is only secondary (like Lady Macbeth) to his ability to discern between what he should and should not do. The prophecies are not proclamations of what will be, but possibilities of things that could be. If Macbeth had decided from the start not to pursue the murder of King Duncan he may not have been king after all, but Shakespeare’s writing does not elude to that possibility. Rather, Shakespeare shows the reader a symbolic character, representing all of the distasteful choices of man that lead inevitably to destruction and death. Fate is therefore variable in the free will Macbeth has to discern. Fate and free will are significant to the events that occur in Macbeth’s life when considered with the choices he makes. Fate is a development of events that is typically outside one’s control and can be assumed to have supernatural elements involved. Taking this into account, it is logical to pair the idea of fate with the presence of the witches. This is not entirely the case with Macbeth however; the world that he is in “has closed around him and rendered him motionless” (Doren 242). The decisions that Macbeth make lead him to a world that is unfamiliar to him and so “terror has degenerated into tedium, and only death can follow” (Doren 243). By his own choices Macbeth creates a universe that follows his own discretion, and thus the play ends with “the gruesome spectacle of the murderer’s head held aloft in triumph” (Ribner 251). Free will is Macbeth’s ability to act based on his own discerning ability, which he exercises freely throughout the tragedy in deciding to kill King Duncan, Murder Banquo, and slaughter Macduff’s family. For Macbeth, the “impulse to evil” must “come from within man himself” (Ribner 247). The most defining decision for Macbeth is his first choice to kill the king because he “can never renounce his free-willed moral choice, once it has been made” (Ribner 246).

Posted in Macbeth

The role of Lady Macbeth in prompting Macbeth to kill King Duncan is weak, as the decision lies with Macbeth. Lady Macbeth has “a poorer imagination” and has “less of that power which enables it [her mind] to stand up under torture” (Doren 240). Still, Lady Macbeth does possess a power over her husband that is enough to quell his deserting thoughts on following through with the plan to kill King Duncan. First, she tells him that “from this time /Such I account thy love (1.7.38-39), and even goes so far as to say she would of “dashed the brains out” of her baby to keep her word to Macbeth (1.7.58). Lady Macbeth, in using this, “seduces” Macbeth though her function is secondary in “the moral choice which is his alone” (Ribner 248). Lady Macbeth is therefore merely a suggestion from which Macbeth draws inspiration because “the cardinal instance of transformation is himself” (Doren 240). Ambition’s role does not take long to surmount upon the mind of Macbeth as it proceeds to influence the actions he welcomes. Within the first scene of the second act, Macbeth is on his way to murder the king: “Is this a dagger I see before me (2.1.41)… Thou marshall’st me the way that I was going; And such an instrument I was to use” (2.1.50-51). Macbeth has become “like Satan” and he “is entirely aware of the evil he embraces” (Ribner 246). The notion for Macbeth to embrace evil so quickly appears odd at first glance to the reader as the first impression of Macbeth is of one who is loyal, noble and honorable (1.2.76). Considering the pre-implied character of Macbeth and the events that have followed through act 1, it is evident that ambition (the trait that will grow hungry and feed on the very soul of Macbeth) is more prominent. Alas Macbeth makes his first life altering decision as the bell rings to signal him to his purpose: “the bell invites me. Hear it not, Duncan; for it is a knell That summons thee to heaven or to hell” (2.1.70-72). After Macbeth kills Duncan, he realizes that he has cut himself off from the righteous path that leads to God: “But wherefore could not I pronounce ‘Amen’? I had most need of blessing, and ‘Amen’ Stuck in my throat” (2.2.39-41). It is through this voluntary choice of evil that Macbeth “closes the way of redemption to him” by denying nature. Therefore he must “end in total destruction and despair” (Ribner 247). By murder Macbeth has been severed of his religion. Once on the path to destruction he decides that turning around would be just as tedious: “I am in blood Stepp’d in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o’er” (3.4.135-37). At this point the character of loyalty and honor has completely dissolved and there is no hope for Macbeth as he has chosen to remain in his own turmoil. It is out of fear and despise of Banquo’s prophecy [his sons will be kings] that Macbeth decides to commit another murder: Banquo (3.1.52-54). It is Macbeth’s choice here that causes him further unrest. Macbeth assumes all has gone well and that upon the death of Banquo his fears will be solved. Upon entering the dining hall where a feast is prepared and guests are gathered however, Macbeth encounters the ghost of Banquo, returned to haunt him: “Thou canst not say I did it: never shake Thy gory locks at me” (3.4.60-61). Macbeth is in denial and not only disregards his actions as not entirely of his own creation, but acts innocent in the presence of Banquo’s ghost.

Posted in Macbeth

A storm lingers overhead as lightning crashes and thunder erupts in booming symphonies over a deserted area in Scotland. The stage is set for the beginning of a tragedy that will follow the decisions and resulting consequences of a single man, leading ultimately to his downfall. In William Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the choices Macbeth makes cause the events in his life despite the prophecies of the witches, the role of fate, and the role of free will. The most influential factors affecting the events that occur in Macbeth’s life are the choices he makes, the mitigating forces of Lady Macbeth, and his own ambition. From the start of the play Macbeth has surrendered his soul as “he is already invaded by those fears which are to render him vicious” and eventually abominable (Doren 239). This is in reference to the first description the reader receives of Macbeth upon discovering the traitor Macdonwald: “With his brandish’d steel, Which smoked with bloody execution, Like a valour’s minion carved out his passage Till he faced the slave; Which ne’er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him, Till he unseam’d him from the nave to the chaps” (1.2.19-24). This is important to note as one follows the tragedy of Macbeth because the characteristics will be driven to new extremes; however the foundation for Macbeth’s deteriorating persona is evident before the play even begins. It is upon hearing the prophecies of what is to be that Macbeth is first enticed and commands the witches to “Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more” (1.3.72). In this short yet simple pronouncement from Macbeth, Shakespeare foreshadows a choice that Macbeth has already made in his mind. The letter sent to Lady Macbeth (1.5.1-14) does invoke her to motivate Macbeth towards mal-deeds; though the character of Macbeth is more susceptible to corruption.

Posted in Macbeth

Get your friends and family together with an fan-taste-different meal at Freddy's!

Posted in Freddy's Frozen Custard

The common stereotype about diabetics is that they cannot eat sugar. This is ridiculous as most food groups contain some orientation of sugar be it glucose, fructose, sucrose, or dextrose. Type 1 diabetics count carbohydrates when using insulin to correct for the sugar that will be broken down upon being consumed. Sugar and carbohydrate ratios are similar in most fast-acting sugars like glucose, however, one has to consider net carbohydrates in complex sugars such as dextrose. Glucose is a simple sugar with six Carbon atoms on its molecular structure (a short carbon chain for a sugar). Dextrose is more of a complex sugar (a type of glucose that is present naturally in foods such as corn). Diabetics CAN eat sugar and as a type 1 diabetic myself I consume sugary foods on a regular basis! The important thing to remember for you other diabetics out there is moderation. Sweets containing glucose is small amounts should be used to treat a low blood sugar. Otherwise stick to complex carbohydrates/sugars such as breads or pastas that are healthy for you and supply long lasting energy.

Posted in Sugar

Difference in white sugar vs. brown sugar!

Posted in Sugar